Projects

 PUBLICATION GUIDELINES FOR PROJECTS

 

BASIC NORMS

·        All authors should review the complete guide below this list of basic norms.

·        The submitted articles must be original and unpublished and of sole responsibility of the author.

·        Manuscripts must have a maximum of 2,500 words.

·        Authors must provide a summary (maximum 100 words).

·        All formal aspects of the manuscript must adhere to the norms contained in the sixth edition of the Publications Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).

·        Authors should include a brief personal profile.

·        When images are included, captions are required.

·        The images are the sole responsibility of the author of the article and must have the corresponding authorization for publication.

·        Footnotes should include brief text, sources and credits.

·        All images and footnotes must be numbered.

·        Images (or renders) must have a minimum resolution of 300 dpi in the format used: 23 cm (maximum) and 10 cm (minimum).

·        Please see the full guide for authors below.

 


PARTS AND ORDER OF THE MANUSCRIPT

 

The manuscripts must be composed of seven parts, presented in the following order:

 

1. HEADER

2. INTRODUCTION

3. DEVELOPMENT AND PARTIAL RESULTS

4. CONCLUSION

5. TECHNICAL DATA SHEET

6. IMAGES

7. AUTHOR'S PROFILE 

 

1.    HEADER

 

It includes the name of the author of the article, the title and the abstract.  

 

TITLE:

It should be short and clear. It may include the commercial name of the project, but should not be limited to it.

It must state unequivocally what the project is about.

Must be in Spanish and English.  

 

SUMMARY:

It must explain the context and relevance of the project.

It must not have more than 100 words.

 

 

2. INTRODUCTION  

It includes four sub-sections:

 

2.1 BACKGROUND OF THE PROBLEM:

Description of the framework (social, political, strategical, territorial, etc.) in which the project is located.

Justification of the relevance of the project.

Exposure and analysis of data obtained in the collection of information for the project.

 

2.2 OBJECTIVES:

Explanation of what the project wants to achieve.

 

2.3 CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK:

Formulation of general theoretical propositions (theories and currents of thought), key concepts and conceptual frames of reference.

 

2.4 BACKGROUND:

Analysis of other projects that solve the problem or a similar problem, expressing a small synthesis of their achievements.

Analysis of projects in other areas that have been considered as a reference.  

 

3. DEVELOPMENT AND PARTIAL RESULTS

It is divided into three sub-sections:

 

3.1 METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK:

Description and analysis of background and methodological references.

 

3.2 METHODOLOGICAL STRATEGY OF THE PROJECT

Fundamentals of methodological strategy.

Description of the methods, techniques, instruments and tools used.

Description of the work plan, activities and phases.

 

3.3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL

Explanation of the attributes of the proposal.

 

4. CONCLUSION

It is divided into three sub-sections:

 

4.1 RESULTS:

Description of how the proposal meets the objective.

 

4.2 EVALUATION:

Analysis of the aspects of the project that constitute an innovation.

Analysis of the achievement of the objectives.

Analysis of future projections.

Explanation of the pending tasks.

 

4.3 CRITICAL REFLECTION:

Analysis of the way the project contributes to the discipline.

 

ABOUT QUOTES IN THE TEXT

Citations must follow the norms contained in the American Psychological Association (APA) manual.  For both, literal quotations and paraphrases, authors must indicate the page number of the quoted fragment.

Example:

A recent study of rental prices in central neighborhoods concludes that "prices behave cyclically, without a stable pattern in the duration of ups and downs" (Bernardi & Moccione, 2010, p. 15).

When successively incorporating several ideas or arguments of another author, the source should be cited as many times as necessary to make the origin of the information clear.

When an author cites secondary sources, ie sources that he did not consult directly but appear in another source consulted, he should follow the scheme proposed by the American Psychological Association (APA).

Example:

Ariès points out that the dead body became a source of macabre eroticism, becoming an object of desire, as can be seen in the popular literature of the time, which includes "scenes of sensuality and desire, starring the living who made love with the dead (as cited in Jiménez Aboitiz, 2012, p.181).


USE OF NOTES

Authors may make footnotes to comment the text. Footnotes should not be used to annotate bibliographic references. Footnotes should be indicated with Arabic numerals, in brackets, in superscript position.

Example:

... the faculty was forced to rethink the themes and the methodological and cognitive instruments when it happened to become a numerous entity (1). The teachers…  

(1)    In 1970, design schools registered 3,500 enrollees, a figure which remained stable until the end of the 1990s. From that moment on, the student population will grow steadily to reach 12,000 enrollees in the period 2005-2010.

 

 

5.      TECHNICAL DATA SHEET

Auhors must include the following items:

Collaborators:

Materials:

Year of execution:

Principal:

 

6. IMAGES

Authors must identify the images in a special listing, according to the following models of image identification, as the case may be:

 

6.1 PHOTOGRAPHS

 

1. Image number

2. Text at the bottom of the image

3. Credit of the image

4. Image source

Example:

Figure 1:

Portrait of the potter Norberto Oropesa.

Photograph: J. Luis Amenábar, 1921.

Source: Castillo Espinoza, E. (2012). Norberto Oropesa, master potter. Santiago: National Council of Culture and Arts.

 

6.2 PROJECT IMAGES

 

1. Image number

2. Name of the work, author of the work, year of completion (for works with location, indicate city or location)

3. Text at the bottom of the image

4. Image credit

5. Image source

 

Example:

Figure 2:

Interactive sound installation, Miguel Morales, 2003, Valparaíso (Chile).

Located in Monjas hill, the installation was the object of interventions by the neighbors.

Photograph: Andrés Santa Cruz, 2003.

Source: www.soundscape.com

 

6.3 GRAPHICS, TABLES, SCHEMES OR INFOGRAPHICS

 

1. Image number

2. Title of chart, table, etc.

3. Source of the graph, table, etc.

4. Year of the information

 

Example:

Figure 3:

Most polluted cities in the world.

Source: World Health Organization

1993.

7. BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW OF THE AUTHOR

 Authors must include their professional profile. The extension should not exceed 120 words. The profile must contain the following information:

 

Given Name

Family Name

Degree

University

Post degrees

University

Academic position (main)

University

Faculty

School/ Department


Most recent publications as author
(maximum 3)

Article title

Journal’s name

Volume

Issue

 

Book title

Publisher

Year

Participation in editorial committees (maximum 2)

Journal / medium

Function

Acknowledgments or Awards (maximum 2)

Institution awarding the prize

Year